Inside the New Subaru XV Crosstrek

Subaru is an auto brand known for versatility and affordability. In 2013, the debut of the XV Crosstrek offered drivers a new solution to urban and off-road vehicles. There are three trims with a 2.0i, 2.0i Premium, and 2.0i Limited showcasing the same handling and performance. They also continue to drive the conversation on safety features with cutting-edge Eyesight Driver Assist Technology that is available on all trims. It helps monitor a slew of driving maneuvers including brake and lane keeping systems.

The fuel efficiency and all-wheel drive reputation is another benefit owners appreciate about this brand. Owners enjoy increased ROI with unique features such as a towing capacity of 1,500 pounds. Maneuverability is another area of supremacy with the smallest turning circle in its class. Ground clearance is approximately nine inches with ramp break-over at 21 degrees, approach angle at 18 degrees, and departure angle hitting nearly 30 degrees. Weekend warriors are drawn to this capability to accommodate camping and boating getaways.

Like any car on the road, there are pros and cons to consider during the decision-making process. Reliability over the long haul coupled with convenience is expected from consumers who want seamless technology. Subaru’s Starlink comes with a seven-inch screen sensitive to touch and voice activated ingenuity. Advantages such as standard key-less remote entry, theft deterrent systems, and engine immobilizer add value to the bottom line. Additional items on the buyer’s checklist will include size, features, and how it competes with its counterparts.

Size, MSRP, Basic Specs

The compact crossover class has a solid and award-winning model in the Subaru XV Crosstrek. Dimensions are in the top one or two positions in wheelbase, length, and width, while taking the number one spot for most legroom for front position passengers. There is 104 inches from the front bumper to lift gates. The chiseled frame has deep aerodynamic qualities that showcase its overall design. A sporty spoiler is a standard feature with an integrated brake light assembly. MSRP is in the low to mid $20,000 range as it delivers more standard features than the competition.

Features

Drivers have seen their share of Subaru XV Crosstreks with kayaks and bicycles securely tied to the standard sturdy roof racks. While this may not be on a list of unique features, it completes the full-suite of cargo management with a 60/40 split rear position. An interior upgrade is the high contrast interior package that dresses seating and steering wheels with leather. Exteriors have an available power moon roof with tilt and sliding functionality.

GPS, satellite radio, and Bluetooth offer convenience for all passengers during each journey. The safety features have a slew of standard solutions with rear-vision cameras and VDC or Vehicle Dynamics Control. Each chassis was engineered with ring-shaped ingenuity that directs energy from a collision around the vehicle and not through it.

How It Stacks Up Against the Competition in the Same Class

Competitors in the same class include the Nissan Juke, Honda HR-V, and Mazda CX-5. They do not offer the symmetrical all-wheel drive and heated interior seats or heated exterior mirrors. Fog lights are standard across the entire Crosstrek roster but not available or optional for the other brands. Windshield wiper de-icers are only match as standard by Honda. The cargo has a standard privacy cover, which is an optional feature for Mazda and Honda. Nissan’s Juke could not answer the call on most of these features.

Motor Trend bestowed praises on the 2016 Subaru XV Crosstrek for cost of ownership and more. The IIHS or Insurance Institute for Highway Safety awarded it the Top Safety Pick Plus for the fourth straight year. Each counterpart was outperformed according to these sources.

Fuel Efficiency

This model has the largest fuel tank capacity in its class with nearly 16 gallons. The competition looks to surpass dominance in this area, but XV Crosstrek hits nearly 35mpg on the highway. Signature engine designs have trademarked the boxer engine configuration. It has built-in intelligent systems with pistons working flawlessly in a side to side motion to mitigate vibration. Lineartronic is another Subaru innovation that uses CVT or continuously variable transmissions to boost performance. It is standard on the Limited, but optional for the Premium trim.

Pros / Cons

This model is listed in Kelley Blue Book as the Most Trusted Brand, Best Overall Brand, and Best Resale Value. Drivers will enjoy the nimble response and handling on a variety of terrains. Well-equipped models still have a MSRP of $25,000. Simplistic interiors offer clutter-free dashes and consoles that are user-friendly. Visibility is another plus with wide front and rear windshields.

As outstanding as this crossover vehicle is, there are a few cons including a lack of acceleration power. The five speed manual and six speed transmissions are noisy and a bit rough while idling. Drivers may want more cargo space to complement the split folding rear seats. There is only one engine selection with a 148hp H4 2.0L power-train.

Ed Aldridge / Shutterstock.com

Ed Aldridge / Shutterstock.com

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